"Gardens, scholars say, are the first sign of commitment to a community. When people plant corn they are saying, let's stay here. And by their connection to the land, they are connected to one another." - Anne Raver

Workshop for UNH Cooperative Extension's Master Gardener Volunteer Program

I need to applaud the folks involved in UNH Cooperative Extension's Master Gardener Program, who are doing important work in our communities. This week at Manchester Community College's community garden, I presented a workshop, "Rooted in Community: Gardening for Food & Resilience." Here are some photos taken by Nate Bernitz of UNH-CE, and here is the workshop description:

There is are no garden without a gardener; likewise, there is no community garden without community. However, the direction of causality is questionable. This workshop will cover principles of community gardening and the big and small practices that enable gardeners to tap into the power of community. Community gardening can be a way to generate local food security, good health, and resilience, but it requires conscious investments of time and talent. What are the interpersonal and organizational tools of community gardening and how are they best used? Participants will learn about various aspects of community garden projects (e.g., learning, wellness, ecological stewardship) and share from their own experiences, struggles, and discoveries. We will also practice gardening in community within an existing project, and take away resources, connections, and ideas to share in our own community and garden contexts.

I especially want to extend appreciation to Ken Laquire, our garden tour guide, dedicated garden task-master and visionary, as well as all the Master Gardeners throughout the State who came to learn and grow together. For more information about MCC's community garden, see this article in the Inklink and this story on WMUR.

Fellow gardeners and community-builders, what workshops, resources, or events would you like to see developed? Connect with me.