"Gardens, scholars say, are the first sign of commitment to a community. When people plant corn they are saying, let's stay here. And by their connection to the land, they are connected to one another." - Anne Raver

Highlights from the 12th International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability

I was honored to be one of twelve Graduate Scholars selected to present and serve at the 12th International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, hosted at Portland State University (Portland, OR) this weekend. Here are a few photo highlights:

Faculty participating in my workshop, "A Scholar's Garden: Inquiry into the Landscape of Food Justice Scholarship and Implications for Sustainability Education." Two main questions we explored, through a collective concept mapping activity, were: How do scholarly disciplines and cultures approach food justice, and what does this mean for sustainability praxis? What could a sustainability pedagogy that embraces food justice look like?
It was a pleasure to get to know and support other Graduate Scholars. Nazan Madak (of Anadolu University in Turkey) and I had a chance to watch the PSU Farmers' Market being set up from the Smith Memorial Student Union on Saturday morning.
My favorite workshop was "School Gardens for All: Diversity and Inclusion," presented by educators in PSU's Sustainability Education, Educational Leadership and Policy, and Indigenous Nations Studies programs, as well as educators from University of British Columbia and Lesley University. Together we created a garden in images and words, inspired by personally and culturally significant relationships with plants. This was an especially inspiring conference experience for me, and I'm grateful for the introduction to such a collaborative, imaginative way of cultivating diversity in sustainability education.
Majestic Mount Hood, where I must visit (not just fly over) on my next trip to Oregon!